Conversations that matter

This year I was fortunate enough to be asked to moderate a panel at Stanford Medicine X. The panel was called “Ah-Ha! moments in mental health and chronic disease management,” and I used the moment to shine a light on the similarities between patient communities regardless of age and diagnosis. The room for our panel was packed, and had standing room only. Each of the panelists – Mark Freeman, Danielle Edges, Ally Ferlito, and Sarah Kucharski – nailed their responses to questions and so clearly articulated the importance of mental health both in their own lives and in the lives of others within their patient communities.

standing-room

We saved time for a few questions at the end, and Christopher Snider pulled one from the live Twitter audience who was tuning in. We also had a physician remind the room how there is simply a lack of training related to patient mental health. His reminder didn’t present as an attack on the panel, but rather as words of empathy and a pleading apology to panelists after hearing how systems have failed and continue to fail some of them. As a follow up to his statement, I reminded everyone in the room how there were several Student Leadership Program attendees present for this session. Hopefully these students – future pharmacists, physicians, and researchers, took away a better understanding of the patient experience. Those attending the conference within the Student Leadership Program (SLP) blossomed, many receiving offers for funding their venture ideas, connecting with physicians for mentorship, and successfully networking amongst other guests. As an SLP Advisor, I felt like a proud parent! It was an honor to help coordinate the SLP program, and to improve upon accessibility efforts. It’s exciting to know that I was one of the youngest people there with very few undergraduate students, yet still tasked with the responsibility and respected for expertise, whether that be as a patient or student. And to think that two years ago I was apprehensive about applying to the program. This just shows that age, degrees, and professional qualifications cannot be substituted for life experience.

Just like last year, I met more people than I can count. But, out of everyone, Elizabeth Jameson stood out as the clear frontrunner as the person who I was supposed to meet. She was a part of the ePatient program as well, and I was immediately drawn to her. Liz was too. elizabethI think that we all had an instant connection. I found one of Elizabeth’s cards on the ground, and can swear that I have come across her artwork somewhere else before. While my admiration of her work certainly opened up the conversation, I believe that we were meant to meet for other reasons. You can see some of her pieces here. Elizabeth specializes in the intersection of art and science, and has secondary progressive Multiple Sclerosis. She and her artist assistant Catherine Monahon have created some incredible pieces over the years, all of which center around her own brain scans, similar to the ones that I have created in the past. I think that Elizabeth’s artwork speaks to the power of the patient voice, and also the reclaiming of one’s condition in a world so focused on fixing and medicating upon diagnosis. Her work is featured in permanent art collections at places like the National Institutes of Health, Stanford University, Yale University, and the Center for Brain Science at Harvard University, and I can only hope that one day we can collaborate on a piece of artwork together.

Friends and conversations had at 2015’s conference have translated into opportunities for 2016-2017, too. I’ll post that update later this month.

Disclosure: This post is one of several as a part of the Stanford Medicine X ePatient Scholar Program – Engagement Track, for which I receive financial support for travel, lodging, and registration fees for this conference. The views expressed in this post are my own.

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