MedX Phoenix Pop Up

It happened. The first ever Stanford Medicine X Phoenix Pop Up took place on April 16th, 2016. SHOW TIME graphic!We were lucky enough to have Executive Board Member Gilles Frydman travel to join us and deliver the opening remarks, as well as document all that took place through his camera lens.

While we weren’t able to share a link to the livestream due to technical difficulties, we had some recording help from ARKHumanity, and two of the talks were recorded and are linked to later in this post below.

We were fortunate enough to have incredible exhibitors from around the valley join us, each of which brought displays that attendees were able to interact with. These displays not only started conversations, but allowed for attendees to ask ourselves and each other questions prior to the evening’s talks like: What if this were me? What if this were my child? Do I need this service?Screen Shot 2016-05-03 at 12.21.35 AM

The program kicked off with Danielle Edges sharing her family’s story that answered those very questions as she told us about her daughter’s reality of navigating life with Heterotaxy Syndrome. Her words and photos shook us all to the core as she read her letter titled, “Dear Heterotaxy.”

Pat Pataranutaporn shared his reason for being a part of the ARKHumanity team, a project derived from Hack4Humanity that bridges the gap between people in crisis and mental health professionals. ARKHumanity utilizes algorithms and key word filtering to listen for suicidal messages within public data on Twitter, and triages to create an outreach interface. Prior to the creation of ARKHumanity, a call for help on social media might go unanswered. Now, that call for help will be answered and can utilize proactive outreach to prevent suicide. They recently collaborated with Arizona State University and Teen Lifeline to conduct research that yielded the findings of 2.6 million tweets that matched suicidal keywords in two weeks time. Wow.

Omron Blauo gave us insight into the work he’s doing in Ghana with Telescrypts, which seeks to bridge health access gaps in remote, low resource communities by providing healthcare workers with data storage tools that innovate their current examination system. In order to do this, Blauo and his team created a durable and long lasting wearable device that records pulse, heart rate, temperature, respirations, and oxygen saturations all of which synch to an app and secure platform on a mobile device, collecting data stored in a cloud without needing wifi. This use of telemedicine pays close attention to cultural and environmental needs, something that wearable devices related to healthcare often do not.

Richard Filley spoke on the topics of doctors, drones and disruption in healthcare. He made connections between aviation and healthcare, and brought up barriers to disruption like regulation from the FAA and the FDA – the ideas of those from outside the profession. These barriers and ideas ultimately got the audience to ask ourselves: When is healthcare’s drone going to land?

Stacey Lihn delivered the keynote and shared her experience as a mom and advocate, as well as founding and being the President of Sisters by Heart, a volunteer organization that provides support, education, and empowerment to families affected by Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome from initial diagnosis and beyond by connecting moms across the country. Lihn taught us how moms are literally and figuratively sitting at the table to improve patient outcomes. She also reminded us that not all care centers are created equal, and that if we want to see improvements in patient care, oftentimes we, the patients and caregivers, are the ones who need to do something to make that change. Because of Lihn’s work as the National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative (NPC-QIC) Parent Lead, NPC-QIC Transparency Workgroup Co-Lead, and NPC-QIC Mortality Workgroup Member, Sisters by Heart is partnered with NPC-QIC to decrease mortality and improve quality of life for infants with single ventricle congenital heart disease and their families. Lihn also serves as a Public Member of the American Board of Pediatrics Foundation, and this level of parent and caregiver engagement is not to be taken lightly.

The closing panel, which consisted of Stacey Lihn, Richard Filley, and Ram Polur had varying perspective that included the caregiver, entrepreneur, and technologist viewpoints. Asking them questions as the moderator was interesting because each of their experiences led to clear expectations for healthcare settings and interactions amongst patients and providers related to trust, respect, and communication.

My personal highlight of the night was getting to learn about the Cardiac 3D Print Lab at the Phoenix Children’s Hospital (PCH). Each heart takes between 3 hours (small) and 5 hours (big) to print. The Cardiac 3D Print Lab teams up with a group called Heart Effect for Screen Shot 2016-05-02 at 7.58.44 PMeducation and emotional support purposes with families after the models have been printed to prepare them for their upcoming surgeries. They also told me how the 3D print lab over at PCH is working with Child Life and the brain tumor patients to print replicas of their brain tumors so that the kids can work through their emotions during treatment. Some kids throw their tumors off of the hospital roof, others smash it with a hammer, and some, similar to our MedX friend Steven Keating, keep theirs!

As soon as the event was over attendees started asking when the next pop up was taking place, if it was going to become an annual event, etc. This event would not have been possible without the help of Danielle on the ground, and the MedX team in Palo Alto. I knew that it was possible to bring a taste of MedX to local communities through having watched livestreams of previous MedX pop ups, but now I have a whole new appreciation for the work that goes into it. If you enjoyed this pop up, you haven’t seen anything yet. Nothing can truly prepare you for the conference itself. For those of you who had your first MedX exposure through this event..I know you want more. See you in September!

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