Three Years Later

Here I am, three years later.

This is a HUGE milestone. Today marks three years post-resection, without recurrence. I have a lot of mixed emotions to describe how I feel about today, but am predominantly overwhelmed with joy and disbelief.

I was incredibly privileged to have access to the surgeon that I did, and I will never ever stop being grateful to Dr. Mitchel Berger at UCSF for what he did for me.

Right after my surgery, I didn’t plan more than three seconds in advance. My eyes would flicker from one corner of the room to the next in amazement that I was still there, and that everyone else was still there with me too. My friends and family never left my side, and I was lucky for that. Many people in the brain tumor community can’t say the same, and I cannot thank all of you for staying by my side when I needed you the most.

When I came to ASU just under a year after surgery, I had a hard time planning more than three hours in advance because I would get so fatigued. Making plans with friends was difficult because everything was so subject to change. But my friends were awesome and so incredibly accommodating.

Then, six months or so went by and I mentally advanced to allow myself to plan three weeks out. I let myself think into the future. The first semester of my freshman year ended, and I advanced to planning a few months at a time in advance. It felt strange, but I was still living from one scan to the next in terms of what I’d let myself think and do. I wasn’t thinking about the next academic or calendar year, summer plans, or classes for the next year. I couldn’t let myself do that because it wasn’t safe to do yet. Then last year, something huge happened. After two years of good scans, I started to plan years in advance. Now, I’m envisioning myself three years from now working in the field, walking around the halls of a hospital, visiting patients. Three years later, and I can now see myself living in the future. This is a gift that I am very privileged to have, and I am not taking it for granted.

I felt like no time passed between the first year after surgery, and that hardly any passed even when I reached the second. Year three finally feels a little bit different. I’m feeling personal growth. I’m finding parts of my identity outside of my health. And I’m succeeding in so many new, different pockets of life. I recently graduated to having scans every 6 months (3 years later and I’m still forever sleeping in a magnet..), so that’s something to be proud of as well. Here I am, now taking on year four.

I read somewhere that scars like this are like a tattoo, but with a better story. My story continues.

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