MRI Findings and Update

The report from my neurosurgeon about my latest MRI scan read:

“I wanted to let you know that I reviewed the current scans on Catherine and everything looked stable going back to the first real postoperative scan in June of 2013. Again seen are some signals around the resection cavity which looks stable and either represents gliosis or some residual tumor cells. There is no contrast enhancement so for now we will assume that this is stable and will continue to follow this carefully with serial imaging. Thanks again for allowing me to see the followup films”

My initial reaction was: “ASSUMED stable?! What do you mean ASSUMED stable?!”

I panicked. If something was in the cavity that wasn’t there four months ago, then it had to be bad. Suddenly, I wanted an opinion that covered the other two brain tumor options – chemotherapy, radiation – as well. I wanted a neuro-oncologist. I went into research mode. The last time I went into research mode I selected four neurosurgeons, sent my scans their way, and had a craniotomy. Research mode doesn’t mess around. I located a neuro-oncologist in the area and began writing down dates and times that my schedule would allow for an appointment. I waited on the line while editing one of my papers (typical college stuff). I walked to class writing down the office’s fax number, and I told my Dad what scans and other information to include in the package. I was all in.

And then, I talked to a veteran caregiver. We met a few months back when her daughter and I also met. This mother is more than just a mother. She is a researcher and a fierce advocator for patients everywhere. She doesn’t settle for rescheduling excuses or test result delays. She demands the best for her daughter’s care and for the care of others. We talked about which specialist I should see, who else I should send me results to, her daughter’s reaction to Temodar, and finally, our own analysis of MRIs. She made me realize something huge. If the tumor was back and growing, it wouldn’t infiltrate an empty cavity. It would most likely do just the opposite! It would start attacking tissue, not growing back into a space that had nothing to feed off of. Scar tissue grows into empty cavities (duh). Whoops.

I have the neuro-oncologist’s information handy if I need it now, but all is well again. My next scan will take place in April or May, and I’ll go from there.

My first week of my second semester of college is just about to wrap up. Besides an insensitive professor, semester two is off to a good start.

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